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| 1 minute read

Attracting and developing talent to technology's highest calling

Very interesting article written by the Chief People Officer (Christy Pambianchi) from Intel which is being discussed at the World Economic Forum right now. It is remarkable (and very encouraging) to think that nine out of ten employees would take a pay cut for more meaningful work (although how much of a cut is not detailed!).

It is certainly true that the workforces of today seem to be much more purpose-driven than ever before and the much heralded ESG revolution is real. Some great advice is given in the article, including the need to re-assess the purpose of your company and capitalise on the fact that employees whose company values are activated and aligned with them personally are far more loyal, engaged, and willing to advocate for their employer. Moreover, if you give your people a stake in purpose-building you can expect them to feel three times more fulfilled..... that is a strong business case to get hem involved.

Christy believes that with the higher calling of combatting climate change, there is a need to connect people, technology and purpose in all that we do, to engage a purpose-driven workforce to develop and in the process solve the challenges we face in the future. Personally I couldn't agree more.

It looks like Intel have a strong strategy in place that is purpose-driven, and I would urge all organisations to think about how they can become more purpose-driven. It is certainly a way in which to attract and retain the best talent in a very competitive talent market. 

  

    

Nine out of ten employees would take a pay cut for more meaningful work

Tags

climate change, purpose, purpose-driven, attracting talent, esg
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