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Insights from the SIA CWS Summit 2024

Last week I had the absolute pleasure of facilitating my first roundtable at this year’s SIA CWS Summit on the topic of ‘Transitioning your MSP’.  

With roundtable delegates representing a number of large blue chip organisations, we discussed the most important factors and key considerations in a transition from one Managed Service Provider to another.

It was fascinating to hear the different experiences as some of the delegates shared their own successes and challenges on already having transitioned from one MSP to another, whilst others were about to embark on a selection/procurement process for a new MSP and we heard from others who were just about to commence on this journey.

 

Some of the key takeaways from the session:

We agreed that the starting point of considering any transition is to ask yourself “what are we trying to achieve” from this change of provider? Is it about innovation, cost savings or even improved technology?  Once you are clear on this objective there are a number of other key steps that businesses can be taking to prepare, such as:

Data – ensuring you have up to date and correct data with details such as source mix, worker pay rates, tenure etc. This information will be crucial to a smooth transition to a new provider and overall experience for the hiring manager and contractor whilst ensuring that there is no disruption to the payment or extension cycle.  

Agree a date for a data freeze  – when does the cut off take place between existing and new provider?  This will ensure that there is a clean transfer of data but also support the work in progress, agreeing owners and stages of cut off and transfer.

Technology – whilst there are lots of considerations when it comes to technology, future technology and ownership of the tech etc, some key areas to focus on should include; highlighting any integrations that are currently in place as these will need to be identified for the change of tech.  Any impact on wider teams to support the facilitation of the finance or HR process and ensuring that the full tech stack including integrations is taken into consideration.

Change and Comms – it is important to have a strong communication plan that includes identifying all service users who will need to be informed of the changes and progress updates. This should include hiring managers, contractors and suppliers but don’t forget other areas that touch the process including Finance, Tax and HR teams.  Overall, a robust comms plan will support the change management programme and experience for all users.

Some further learnings I took from the session, firstly all delegates said their number one priority was business continuity. Having minimal to no disruption to their hiring managers and in turn to any critical projects or programmes is incredibly important, particularly ones heavily supported by contingent workers.

Innovation was another key call out, customers wanted to ensure that innovation was being brought by the new provider, particular when it came to technology which supported the solution, with a real mix of organisations who had procured their own VMS or planned on using the MSP’s technology. 

I thoroughly enjoyed chairing this incredibly insightful roundtable and hearing from this diverse group of delegates from all different sectors, calling out the benefits of change and sharing their successes and challenges. 

Learn more about integrating contingent labor into strategic talent planning here.

All delegates said their number one priority was business continuity. Having minimal to no disruption to their hiring managers and in turn to any critical projects or programmes is incredibly important, particularly ones heavily supported by contingent workers.

Tags

ams, cws, talent acquisition, talent climate, total talent, candidate attraction